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NEWSLETTER January 2012

Dear Members and Friends,

Happy New Year! As The Bahamas celebrates the golden jubilee anniversary of women’s suffrage, The Bahamas Historical Society is proud to present a salute to the earliest women to make waves in the social arena – Female Slaves in The Bahamas – a talk by Dr Jennifer Bethel.

Time: Thursday 26th January at 6pm

Dr. Jennifer Bethel
Dr. Jennifer Bethel is a Graduate professor at Barry University where she lectures educational students in Research Methodology with emphasis on research designs and methods emphasizing their underlying assumptions and inquiry aims. In addition, she provides consultation to schools which seek organizational restructuring by providing first-hand knowledge of current school practices and programming options. Dr. Bethel obtained both her AA in Social Studies and B. Ed. at the College of The Bahamas, along with a Teaching Certificate in conjunction with the University of The West Indies. Dr. Bethel holds a MPA from Nova Southeastern University with an emphasis on group dynamics and conflict resolution, and a Ph.D. in Education with a specialization in Leadership from Barry University.

Female Slaves in The Bahamas
This study offers seminal exploration and an essential starting point to better understand the impact that female slaves had on the tapestry of Bahamian society. Though the primary purpose of enslaved women in the New World was for their labour; simultaneously, their functions became one of great complexity due to the multiplicity of roles they came to occupy. Burdened with binary oppressive conditions, due to their racial and gender orientation, many Black women were challenged daily. Despite initial hesitation on the part of plantation owners, there came to be equal numbers of women working in the fields as there were men during the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. While young females engaged in a variety of roles inclusive of field and domestic works, their mature counterparts engaged in midwifery, nursing, and tending to the young and elderly. Resistance against slavery was also ever-present and, like the men, Bahamian female slaves engaged in various forms of resistance. Inclusive of subtle behaviours were back-talking and refusal to work, whereas more aggressive forms included running away to outright revolt, while bearing arms.

We are also pleased to announce that the Nassau Music Society will promote a concert at the museum on Friday 27th January (details to follow)

We had good press from the last musical concert...here is an excerpt:
Nassau Chamber Ensemble at the Historical Society Museum

Excerpts from the critique by Anita L. MacDonald, MMus, MS, MBA, GPC/MIS

The Nassau Chamber Ensemble played its second concert of the year at the acoustically and visually delightful Historical Society Museum, home of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (I.O.D.E.) on Sunday afternoon. Under the direction of Noel Thompson and with the arrangements and transcriptions provided by Helene Peloquin, the 12-member string and cembalo group gave its second-ever performance.

These moments of intimacy are what make chamber groups so delectable. The audience is at one with the performers in a cozy, informal setting. The affection and sheer pleasure that they shared in the music and in one another were obvious. In essence, the audience was cheering for the home team!

The Nassau Chamber Ensemble has grown in professionalism since its debut, thanks in no small part to their new venue, the Historical Society Museum, which enables them to hear one another more clearly as they perform, leading to a more homogeneous sound and cleaner finishes. Also, they now stand to play, which really does make a difference in the sound in that the musicians are now engaging their entire bodies. We await their next performance with great expectations.

Kind regards

J Lawlor


Dear Members and friends,

Don’t forget the talk on the THURSDAY 26TH JANUARY at 6pm – Female Slaves in The Bahamas by Dr Jennifer Bethell. (Robert Dorsett has setup a channel on www.ustream.com for the Society which allows for the live streaming of events. The channel is http://www.ustream.tv/channel/bahamas-historical-society
If persons are not able to attend the meeting they can view it online by simply going to that site in real time.)

Another treat is a concert by the Nassau Musical Society

Nassau Music Society - An Evening of Classical Guitar: Featuring Marco Tamayo and Anabel Montesinos

Friday, January 27th, 2012 - 8:00 PM - The Bahamas Historical Society, Shirley St. & Elizabeth Avenue

Sunday, January 29th, 2012 - 5:30 PM - St. Paul's Church Hall, Lyford Cay

The Nassau Music Society continues its 2011-2012 Season with two evenings of classical guitar featuring Marco Tamayo and Anabel Montesinos, well-known, young musicians in the world of classical guitar. These concerts are under the patronage of His Excellency Sir Arthur Foulkes, Governor General of The Bahamas and are sponsored by Société Générale Private Banking, Pictet, Royal Star Assurance and Colina Insurance Limited.

Marco Tamayo was born in La Havana, Cuba, were he started to play guitar at the age of three under his father's tuition. He studied with Antonio Alberto Rodríguez and Leo Brouwer, Harold Gramatges, and later in Europe at the University of Music in Munich (Germany, class of Joaquin Clerch), and at the Mozarteum University of Arts in Salzburg were he studied with Eliot Fisk (guitar) and Rainner Schmid (violinist), among others.

Winner of major International Guitar Competitions such as the Michele Pittaluga Intl.Guitar Competition in 1999 and the Andrés Segovia Intl. Guitar Competition in Granada , Spain , Marco Tamayo performed concerts with the Chamber Orchestra of St. Petersburg, the Philarmonic of Torino under the baton of Paolo Ferrara, the Chamber Orchestra of Aix-en-Provence (France), under the baton of Philip Bender, the Philarmonic of Tampere (Finland), the Philarmonic of La Habana under the baton of Leo Brouwer and the TransArt Orchestra of Salzburg conducted by Kurt Redel.

Marco Tamayo's recordings include one album for the Voice of Lyrics label in France , and three albums for the Naxos Classical Label. He was named Honourable Citizen of the city of Alessandria ( Italy ) and is the second guitarist, after Maestro Alirio Díaz, to have received this honour. He lives in Austria with his wife Anabel.

Anabel Montesinos, one of the most important personalities in the world of classical guitar, was described as a "promising star of the classical guitar" by Antón García Abril, after he heard her play at the age of fifteen. She is the winner of several international competitions such as the renowned "Francisco Tarrega" competition in Spain or the "Michele Pittaluga" in Italy . Her musical style, taste and choices of interpretation have charmed the audience at each performance.

Anabel Montesinos began her musical education at the age of five and playing guitar at the age of six. She proved to be an extraordinary child, and a few years later, when she was twelve years old, she gave a solo recital in Majorca . Anabel Montesinos has recorded for radio and television in Spain , Poland , Italy and Sweden . Numerous awards in international competitions opened the doors for her to the Naxos Classic label, where she was able to record her first album with a romantic repertoire. This CD has been hailed by the international press and was chosen by British Airlines for its music program on international flights.

Anabel Montesinos participated in concerts with Paco de Lucia, playing the "other side of Spanish guitar," and received a standing ovation in Uppsala , Sweden .
She has performed as soloist with the Philharmonic Orchestras of Moscow, St. Petersburg, Turin, Monterrey (Mexico), Madrid, and Oulu (Finland), to name a few.
Her 2011 tour began at Carnegie Hall, where she received a standing ovation. She plays a Simon Marty guitar. Her second album, also produced by Naxos , was released in September, 2011. She is married to Marco Tamayo and the couple live in Austria.

They are expected to hold a Master Class for classical guitarists. The date, time and venue will be announced shortly. Persons wishing to participate or attend should contact Italia Watkins-Jan at the Nassau Music Society admin@nassaumusicsociety.org or Dr. Christy Lee docchristy@gmail.com by Wednesday, January 25th, 2012.

Reserve tickets now: www.nassaumusicsociety.org/reservations . Box Offices: A.D. Hanna & Co., Deveaux Street; Custom Computers, Cable Beach Shopping Centre; Logos Bookstore Harbour Bay Shopping Centre; and Moir & Co., Lyford Cay Shopping Centre.
Tickets: Members: $25; Non-Members: $35; Students with valid id: $10. Tickets cost an extra $5 if purchased at the door.

Rosalie Fawkes sent in a link to access "From Burma Road to Majority Rule":

http://www.sirrandolfawkes.com/from_burma_road_to_majority_rule


I do have a question for you. In the Paradise island book, it is mentioned that J.L. Saunders had a casino on Hog Island - do you know if that was James Leacher Saunders, the brother of Margaret Alice Christie nee Saunders and Edward Charles Saunders? He would be my great uncle - Margaret Alice is my grandmother. (from Priscilla Benner)


A reminiscence on the sport of crabbing (From my unpublished book on Paul Albury)

Another summer pastime popular in Harbour Island was crabbing. About seven o’ clock in the evening several small boats would make the half hour sail across the harbour to Bottom Bay or Rock-a-Bay or Cistern on the North Eleuthera shore. The four or five member crew were usually made up of a father or older relative and young boys, each carrying a three foot long, four inch diameter long black torch made up of one inch diameter branches of a suitable tree all tied together with cord. They also carried a plait basket home made from palmetto leaves with a capacity to carry about six dozen crabs. They would make their way a short distance into the bush and light their torch ‘to make a glare’ to see the crabs, which were attracted to the light. They picked them up until their baskets were full and return home sometimes as late as 4 o’ clock the next morning. White crabs were caught this way but black crabs were obtained by turning over the rocks in daylight.

In September, the white crabs would bury themselves in ‘the mold’ down a hole. In November, it was a young boy’s delight when he heard the words, “Lets go molding”. Each of the crew would now carry a grub hoe and machete on their voyage across the harbour in daylight. Whenever they saw a mold, they would dig it out and push their hand down the hole, a dangerous move, but they skillfully picked the crab up and pulled it out of the hole. On a good day they could pick up two dozen crabs, which were now fat and delicious, when cracked open and boiled, especially with white rice. One of the best Christmas gifts appreciated in Harbour Island at that time was to receive a couple of boiled moldy crabs for breakfast.

Hey Jim, I know that old lighthouse building. It used to be the old Hatchet Bay store. Violet Knowles..unfortunately a few people have told me that this was not the lighthouse headquarters

From Paul Aranha “Jane Lloyd pointed out that LYCHgate is the correct word for what I have been calling Lynch Gate.

There's one at the Nassau War Cemetery, the Eastern Cemetery and the Veterans' Cemetery.

A Lychgate is a covered open structure, found at a church gate. It normally consists of four or six oak posts embedded in the ground in a rectangular shape. On top of this are a number of beams to hold a steeply sloping straight pitched roof covered in wooden or clay peg tiles.

The name is derived from the Saxon Lych meaning "corpse" and gate meaning entrance. Hence corpse entrance.

The lychgates were built from about the mid 15th century. It was the custom at the time for priests to conduct the first part of the funeral service under its shelter.

During medieval times the rich were the only people buried in coffins. The poor were carried to the lychgate and placed on a stone or wooden table covered in a shroud before burial.

From Tom Dolezal on War Graves: Thank you for all your invaluable help and support for our website http://fcafa.wordpress.com/2012/01/06/not-forgotten-bahamas-2/

Kind regards

 

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